Cara Galowitz – Corona, Queens

Review by Wayne Swanson • “Beauty is where you find it,” said the great philosopher Madonna, who lived for a while on her way to stardom in the neighborhood of Corona in the borough of Queens, New York. She is among many notable one-time residents, including Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie, Martin Scorsese, and Archie Bunker. Corona... Continue Reading →

Juan Barte – Freedom Tastes of Reality

Review by Gerhard Clausing • “What do we yearn for? What exactly have we lost?” There is something very refreshing about Juan Barte’s new photobook. It is based on his observation that our freedom has been severely curtailed in recent times, both by ever-present technology and by the pandemic. Both of these hold us captive... Continue Reading →

PhotoBook Journal Issue #40

Welcome to our 40th and mid-summer Issue •We have an extensive list of photobook reviews that we published in July to help you with your summer reading. This will help us coast through the month of August while we will be on holidays for much of this month as well. All in preparation for the Fall... Continue Reading →

Gianluca Galtrucco – Time Traveler

Book review by Rudy Vega • The recent publication, Time Traveler by Gianluca Galtrucco is a love letter to the daydreamer in all of us. Making clever use of props, settings, archival footage and captions–Galtrucco has produced a book that guides us back to engage in youthful wonderment. Gazing up to the night skies, who has not pondered... Continue Reading →

Gary Green – Obelisks

Review by Steve Harp •  obelisk: a tapering four-sided shaft of stone, usually monolithic and having a pyramidal apex; SYN: column, daggar, mark, monolith, monument, needle, pillar, pylon, shaft, tower.  Gary Green’s 2021 monograph, Obelisk is a lovely book.  Softcover, measuring 4 ½” x 9”, it fits comfortably in one hand, reminding me of nothing so much as a... Continue Reading →

Jörgen Axelvall – And I Reminisce

Book review by Rudy Vega • As art mediums go, photography situates itself nicely as a means to aid in recollecting. Photography assists one in filling gaps left by the leaky apparatus known as our memories. Photographic images are still open to interpretation, but placed within the appropriate context can be powerful triggers, enabling one to... Continue Reading →

Harry Gruyaert: India

Review by Melanie Chapman • The mystery that is India, “where you can touch what is most essential, where life and death are always side-by-side.” This is the subject of the new photobook by renowned colorist Harry Gruyaert, representing a dozen trips made over the span of forty years. In his introduction, Magnum photographer Gruyaert reflects on... Continue Reading →

Ara Oshagan – displaced

Review by Steve Harp • As I looked through Ara Oshagan’s 2021 monograph displaced, for some odd reason I was reminded of James Agee’s 1941 study of tenant farming in the American south, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.  There is a surface level of similarity in that both books are, in a sense “documentary” - considerations of the lives of... Continue Reading →

Riley Goodman – From Yonder Wooded Hill

Review by Wayne Swanson • The hills and hollers along the Appalachian Mountains running down the eastern United States are steeped in folklore and folkways. In From Yonder Wooded Hill, photographer Riley Goodman spins a narrative tale from his experiences there and the stories he heard growing. Drawing from his own photos, archival images, short passages of text and poetry,... Continue Reading →

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