Vera Lutter: Museum in the Camera

Review by Steve Harp • I have long found the images of Vera Lutter among the most challenging and thought-provoking in contemporary photography.  Lutter’s work is that rare combination of visually beautiful (sublime would be a better word), conceptually challenging (“good to think with,” to use Claude Levi-Strauss’ phrase) and continually surprising (perhaps odd, given the... Continue Reading →

Lukas Birk – House No6

Review by Wayne Swanson • Planning a photobook and assembling all the images needed to tell your story is a process that can take years. Unless you’re Lukas Birk, who did it all in one day. Birk is an Austrian photographer, archivist, and publisher. He has travelled the world producing complex books and curatorial projects in... Continue Reading →

Charles Rozier – House Music

Review by Madhu Joseph John • Art book critics generally use criteria such as contents and caliber of images, layout, production niceties, such as quality of paper, design, and above all, the originality of the subject matter to analyze books they wish to review. In House Music, a photobook by Charles Rozier, many of these... Continue Reading →

PhotoBook Journal – Issue #16

Welcome to our 16th Issue •Maybe one of the few bright spots during a pandemic is that there is a lot more time at home getting comfy and reading books. Nevertheless, the socio-economic issues continue to grow, especially in the United States, with the pandemic death rate continuing at an awful pace. All without any federal government leadership... Continue Reading →

Valery Faminsky – Berlin Mai 1945

Review by Gerhard Clausing • 75 years ago, in April of 1945, Berlin was at the end of being the citadel of an authoritarian “empire” that lasted twelve years. As the Red Army was marching in, Hitler was ending his life, and the city was in physical and psychological shambles. Among the troops was a... Continue Reading →

Allen Wheatcroft – Body Language

Review by Gerhard Clausing • We expect contemporary street photography to go beyond what was traditional, which often sought out dingy and dreary locations and moments to show the lesser side of things. We expect contemporary street photographers to capture the dynamic nature of city hustle and bustle, people unobserved and interactively pursuing their business,... Continue Reading →

Dara McGrath – Project Cleansweep

Review by Douglas Stockdale • What might imminent danger look like? Will something look so out of place or potentially evil that this might provide the necessary visual clues to warn us to become diligent, alert and stay cautious? Would there be something such as a dark stain on the land with something suspicious emanating... Continue Reading →

Fabien Fourcaud – Off season

Review by Wayne Swanson • Ah, summer at the sea shore. Endless beaches and bronzing bodies in the sand. Resort hotels and cocktails with little umbrellas in them. Tourists everywhere, reveling in their escape from the day-to-day. Now consider off-season. Beaches and resort hotels empty, streets deserted, tourists banished to their day-to-day. Photographer Fabien Fourcaud explores... Continue Reading →

Jakob de Boer – Where Ravens Cry

Review by Douglas Stockdale • Jakob de Boer takes us on his mystical and mythological journey into the Pacific Northwest, a place of memories, and the resulting black and white landscape photographs become meditative poems. His narratives encompass abstract and ambiguous shapes and forms that explore the black and white scale. Other photographs are inclusive... Continue Reading →

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