PhotoBook Journal – Issue #32

Welcome to our 32nd Issue • As the month of November draws to a close, we begin our holiday season with the start of Hanukkah and our staff picks for our list of "Interesting Artist and PhotoBooks for 2021." I think that this list is diverse as ever and it is not meant to be the "Best" photobooks for the year (although many... Continue Reading →

Roger Bruhn – Pictures of No Consequence

Review by Gerhard Clausing • Spending time with this photobook has some consequences, in spite of the title, which is probably somewhat facetious. What is street photography? What are the implications of observing a photographer’s street observations? And perhaps even more important, what is the photographer’s intent, and what is the viewer’s response to all... Continue Reading →

PhotoBook Journal – Issue #31

Welcome to our 31st Issue • We are in the midst of the Fall releases and there is still some logistical chaos here in the U.S., with some publisher (& author/photographer) angst. Regretfully all of this is probably going to lead to some price increases for photobooks (actually all books of every kind and sort). For October we... Continue Reading →

Roger Bruhn – Nothing To See Here

Review by Gerhard Clausing • Photography is at its best when it arouses the viewer’s imagination. What, when, where, why – are the questions that can be of foremost concern when we, the viewers, are rattled into participatory looking and are projecting ourselves into images that are presented to us by someone else. Particularly during... Continue Reading →

PhotoBook Journal – Issue #28

Welcome to our 28th Issue • We are hoping you are enjoying your summer holidays and vacations. We are continuing our book sale fund raiser and really appreciate your responses with book purchases and donations. These make a difference and keep us going. Thank you! I am very delighted to work with Medium Photo again this fall to lead my Zoom creative book workshop, an... Continue Reading →

Roger Bruhn – 8 ½ Garbage Cans

Review by Steve Harp • I find surreal one of the most consistently misused of words, not only in art contexts but in general usage as well. Most often the speaker will mean visually fantastic or simply unbelievable. However, this is far from the concept of “surrealism” as offered by Andre Breton in his manifestos.  For Breton, surreal meant... Continue Reading →

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