Wesley Channell – Human Canvas

Review by Gerhard Clausing • Here’s a list of ingredients for an exciting project: A dynamic photographer with an understanding of modern art and an appreciation of the beauty of the human body (Wesley Channell) A visual artist with a love for body painting and an understanding of performance, sets, and backgrounds (Alexis Logwood) Talented... Continue Reading →

Christian Michael Filardo – Gerontion

Review by Steve Harp • Each photograph in Christian Michael Filardo’s Gerontion is a puzzle, a mystery, an enigma. Gerontion takes its title from a poem of the same name by T. S. Eliot, first published in 1920. The poem is the monologue by an elderly (“gerontic”) man expressing his thoughts on Europe after the First World... Continue Reading →

Sarah Hadley – Lost Venice

Review by Douglas Stockdale • The loss of a parent is always emotionally difficult regardless of one’s age, perhaps especially if this event occurs early in one’s life. The ways an individual can come to terms with the tragic impact varies. For Sarah Hadley an emotional convergence occurred well after her father’s passing at a... Continue Reading →

Ekaterina Vasilyeva – Road to Petergof

Review by Douglas Stockdale • This is a narrative about an indirect journey along the road that connects St. Petersburg to the city of Petergof, where the Russian Tsar Peter the Great built large Russian estates as his equivalence to the 18th century French estates and expansive gardens. This is also an investigation of an... Continue Reading →

Paulo Nozolino – Loaded Shine

 Review by Steve Harp • When I saw the title of Paulo Nozolino’s newest monograph, Loaded Shine (Steidl, 2018), I immediately was reminded of Daniel Lanois’ song Shine, the title track of his 2003 album. An idiosyncratic connection, no doubt, elicited by my love for Lanois’s music and Shine is one of his most achingly beautiful songs.... Continue Reading →

Shane Lavalette – Still (Noon)

Review by Douglas Stockdale • Shane Lavalette was commissioned to follow the footsteps of the Swiss photographer Theo Frey (1908–1997), one of the leading Swiss photojournalists of his day, who had set out in 1939 to photograph the Swiss landscape in for the Swiss National Exhibition. Lavalette investigated the same twelve Swiss villages as did Frey... Continue Reading →

Anja Niemi – In Character

Guest review by Dia Yunzhi Wang • As a female photographer, I would always have the desire to document the moments that I let ‘myself’ out. I’d be hopping up and down on empty streets with arms waving high, shaking my body like a disco-maniac when the playlist shuffles to a love dance song and... Continue Reading →

Aline Smithson – Los Angeles

Review by Douglas Stockdale •  The Kris Graves Projects Lost series (currently Lost II, set of 20 books with slipcase) are regional investigations each by a photographer who calls it home; the book series is complementary and expanded on by the broader collective; how do you define a region (place), what does it really tell a... Continue Reading →

Julia Borissova – Nautilus

  Review by Douglas Stockdale • What is a museum? One brief definition is offered by Wikipedia; an institution that cares for a collection of artifacts and other objects of artistic, cultural, historical, or scientific importance. Then what is an imaginary museum? This is the subject of Julia Borissova’s recent photobook Nautilus. Borissova’s urban setting for... Continue Reading →

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