Ekaterina Vasilyeva – Road to Petergof

Review by Douglas Stockdale • This is a narrative about an indirect journey along the road that connects St. Petersburg to the city of Petergof, where the Russian Tsar Peter the Great built large Russian estates as his equivalence to the 18th century French estates and expansive gardens. This is also an investigation of an... Continue Reading →

Paulo Nozolino – Loaded Shine

 Review by Steve Harp • When I saw the title of Paulo Nozolino’s newest monograph, Loaded Shine (Steidl, 2018), I immediately was reminded of Daniel Lanois’ song Shine, the title track of his 2003 album. An idiosyncratic connection, no doubt, elicited by my love for Lanois’s music and Shine is one of his most achingly beautiful songs.... Continue Reading →

Shane Lavalette – Still (Noon)

Review by Douglas Stockdale • Shane Lavalette was commissioned to follow the footsteps of the Swiss photographer Theo Frey (1908–1997), one of the leading Swiss photojournalists of his day, who had set out in 1939 to photograph the Swiss landscape in for the Swiss National Exhibition. Lavalette investigated the same twelve Swiss villages as did Frey... Continue Reading →

Anja Niemi – In Character

Guest review by Dia Yunzhi Wang • As a female photographer, I would always have the desire to document the moments that I let ‘myself’ out. I’d be hopping up and down on empty streets with arms waving high, shaking my body like a disco-maniac when the playlist shuffles to a love dance song and... Continue Reading →

Aline Smithson – Los Angeles

Review by Douglas Stockdale •  The Kris Graves Projects Lost series (currently Lost II, set of 20 books with slipcase) are regional investigations each by a photographer who calls it home; the book series is complementary and expanded on by the broader collective; how do you define a region (place), what does it really tell a... Continue Reading →

Julia Borissova – Nautilus

  Review by Douglas Stockdale • What is a museum? One brief definition is offered by Wikipedia; an institution that cares for a collection of artifacts and other objects of artistic, cultural, historical, or scientific importance. Then what is an imaginary museum? This is the subject of Julia Borissova’s recent photobook Nautilus. Borissova’s urban setting for... Continue Reading →

Keith Carter – Fifty Years

Review by Wayne Swanson • The renowned photographic artist Keith Carter has been called a “poet of the ordinary,” and this sumptuous new retrospective is truly an epic poem, lyrical yet down to earth. Fifty Years is epic in size and scale. The 320 unnumbered pages include 267 images from his half-century (so far) career. They... Continue Reading →

Julia Borissova – Let Me Fall Again

Let Me Fall Again, Julia Borissova, Copyright 2018 Artist: Julia Borissova (born Talinn, Estonia, resides St. Petersburg, RU) Self-Published: St Petersburg, Russia Essay, Julia Borissova Text: Russian, English Stiffcover book, handsewn binding, stitching, inserts, gate-folds, First edition of 239, hand-made in Russia Photobook designer: Julia Borissova Notes: It was not until I had a chance to spend time... Continue Reading →

Cig Harvey – You An Orchestra You a Bomb

Photographer: Cig Harvey (born Devon, UK & resides in Rockport, Maine) Published by Schilt Publishing, (Amsterdam, NL), 2017 Essay: Vicki Goldberg Text: English Hardbound with linen covers, sewn binding, four-color lithography, printed by Offizin Scheufele, Stuttgart (DR) Photobook designer: Deb Wood (Brooklyn, NY) Notes: This is Cig Harvey’s third photobook in her introspective series that investigates... Continue Reading →

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