Ralph Eugene Meatyard – Stages For Being

Review by Douglas Stockdale • The late Ralph Eugene (Gene) Meatyard, 1925 – 1972, was an optician whose personal artistic quest has had an extended impact on contemporary photography. In 1972, at the time of Meatyard’s passing, my personal interest in the creative aspects of photography were just beginning to take shape. At that time,... Continue Reading →

David Pace & Stephen Wirtz – Images in Transition

Review by Paul Anderson • Images in Transition, Wirephotos 1938 - 1945 presents artistic interpretations of wartime wirephotos from the second world war. Wirephoto technology was used to transmit black and white photographs from the war-front back to media centers, in this case located in the United States. Stephen Wirtz collected these wirephotos, and at the... Continue Reading →

Bill Henson – The Light Fades But the Gods Remain

Review by Wayne Swanson • So often, suburbia is portrayed as a bland and vacuous place — tract homes, franchise convenience stores, and a lot of sullen youth. That’s not the way Australian photographer Bill Henson sees it. Through Henson’s lens, suburbia is a dreamscape filled with dark shadows, fluffy clouds, Egyptian ruins, teenage angst, pastoral... Continue Reading →

Wesley Channell – Human Canvas

Review by Gerhard Clausing • Here’s a list of ingredients for an exciting project: A dynamic photographer with an understanding of modern art and an appreciation of the beauty of the human body (Wesley Channell) A visual artist with a love for body painting and an understanding of performance, sets, and backgrounds (Alexis Logwood) Talented... Continue Reading →

Christian Michael Filardo – Gerontion

Review by Steve Harp • Each photograph in Christian Michael Filardo’s Gerontion is a puzzle, a mystery, an enigma. Gerontion takes its title from a poem of the same name by T. S. Eliot, first published in 1920. The poem is the monologue by an elderly (“gerontic”) man expressing his thoughts on Europe after the First World... Continue Reading →

Sarah Hadley – Lost Venice

Review by Douglas Stockdale • The loss of a parent is always emotionally difficult regardless of one’s age, perhaps especially if this event occurs early in one’s life. The ways an individual can come to terms with the tragic impact varies. For Sarah Hadley an emotional convergence occurred well after her father’s passing at a... Continue Reading →

Ekaterina Vasilyeva – Road to Petergof

Review by Douglas Stockdale • This is a narrative about an indirect journey along the road that connects St. Petersburg to the city of Petergof, where the Russian Tsar Peter the Great built large Russian estates as his equivalence to the 18th century French estates and expansive gardens. This is also an investigation of an... Continue Reading →

Paulo Nozolino – Loaded Shine

 Review by Steve Harp • When I saw the title of Paulo Nozolino’s newest monograph, Loaded Shine (Steidl, 2018), I immediately was reminded of Daniel Lanois’ song Shine, the title track of his 2003 album. An idiosyncratic connection, no doubt, elicited by my love for Lanois’s music and Shine is one of his most achingly beautiful songs.... Continue Reading →

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