Pradip Malde – From Where Loss Comes

Reviewed by Madhu Joseph-John • This is what you might first see when you have Pradip Malde’s photo book in your hand: women, young and old, some with head covers, some with razor blade in hand, others grinding a clay like mass with stones, girls with their legs splayed and being held down by women, acacia... Continue Reading →

Ara Oshagan – displaced

Review by Steve Harp • As I looked through Ara Oshagan’s 2021 monograph displaced, for some odd reason I was reminded of James Agee’s 1941 study of tenant farming in the American south, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.  There is a surface level of similarity in that both books are, in a sense “documentary” - considerations of the lives of... Continue Reading →

Riley Goodman – From Yonder Wooded Hill

Review by Wayne Swanson • The hills and hollers along the Appalachian Mountains running down the eastern United States are steeped in folklore and folkways. In From Yonder Wooded Hill, photographer Riley Goodman spins a narrative tale from his experiences there and the stories he heard growing. Drawing from his own photos, archival images, short passages of text and poetry,... Continue Reading →

Caroline Irby – Someone Else’s Mother

Review by Melanie Chapman • What is it that constitutes family? Is it a matter of love, or bloodline alone? Is family determined by time spent together, common interests, shared experience? Is family a matter of choosing whom among billions of people on the planet we trust and look out for and want to be with?... Continue Reading →

Neil Folberg – A Mirror in Macedonia

Review by Douglas Stockdale • This book is part retrospective with an autobiography about the early phase of Neil Folberg’s long photographic career, and part portfolio for early unpublished body of work. As an interesting combination of biography and portfolio, it is front-loaded with his personal reflections on his career change to photography while studying at... Continue Reading →

Michal Adamski – Two Tailed Dog

Review by Wayne Swanson • Phony patriotism. Vilifying the opposition. Demonizing outsiders. Sound familiar? The days of Making America Great Again may be over, at least for now, but the problem is international.  Perhaps nowhere is the rise of nationalism, populism, and authoritarianism more of an issue than in Hungary under the regime of Viktor Orbán.... Continue Reading →

Chris Killip – The Station

Review by Melanie Chapman • Who doesn’t love the smell of sweat, stale beer, and vomit? Who doesn’t fondly remember the danger of getting your eye poked out by the spikey hair of an amped up punk thrashing around in a mosh pit? Not you? Well then move right along Granny; this aint your book.... Continue Reading →

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