Rohina Hoffman – Hair Stories

Review by Melanie Chapman • Considering that photographer Rohina Hoffman’s day job is as a neurologist studying what goes on in a person’s mind, it should come as no surprise that her first monograph she would focus on what comes out of a person’s head. Specifically, what grows out of a person’s scalp, and how... Continue Reading →

Shane Lavalette – Still (Noon)

Review by Douglas Stockdale • Shane Lavalette was commissioned to follow the footsteps of the Swiss photographer Theo Frey (1908–1997), one of the leading Swiss photojournalists of his day, who had set out in 1939 to photograph the Swiss landscape in for the Swiss National Exhibition. Lavalette investigated the same twelve Swiss villages as did Frey... Continue Reading →

Louie Palu – A Field Guide to Asbestos

Review by Douglas Stockdale • Working in a very technical area for my day-job I have become very familiar with on-the-job training, educational manuals, and health & safety bulletins that stress environmental awareness. I will admit that it was not until reading Louie Palu’s A Field Guide to Asbestos did the immense danger of asbestos really... Continue Reading →

Maria Thereza Alves – Recipes for Survival

Review by Wayne Swanson • Let us now praise Maria Thereza Alves. Over the past four decades, this Brazilian-born artist, social activist, and documentarian has established an international reputation as a champion for social justice. In 1983, however, she was just a 21-year-old junior studying photography at Cooper Union in New York City who decided... Continue Reading →

Brenda Ann Kenneally – UPSTATE GIRLS

Review by Melanie Chapman • “A magnum opus project spanning 14 years, UPSTATE GIRLS documents’ the troubles and triumphs of a group of friends and their extended families in upstate New York.” For many years now, I have indulged in two great passions. One is photography, the other is what I jokingly refer to as... Continue Reading →

Karianne Bueno – Doug’s Cabin

Review by Wayne Swanson • It’s not easy to find Doug’s cabin. Or Doug himself, for that matter. Doug lives deep in the rainforest at the remote northwestern tip of Vancouver Island. He’s the proprietor of the San Josef Heritage Park and Campground, a grand name for a struggling collection of primitive campsites. He’s a... Continue Reading →

Miquel Gonzalez — Memoria Perdida

Review by Wayne Swanson • “Let’s go for a walk.” That might sound like a pleasant invitation, but in the Spain of dictator Francisco Franco, it was often a chilling euphemism for a death sentence. During the Spanish Civil War (1936–39) and its aftermath, armed bands would round up people, take them to a remote... Continue Reading →

Martin Toft – Te Ahi Kā

Review by Wayne Swanson • “. . . we went up to Mangapapapa to establish a place of wānanga for the river and it's many connections through whakapapa.” That neatly sums up Te Ahi Kā: The Fires of Occupation by photographer Martin Toft. But it takes quite a journey up the Whanganui River on the north... Continue Reading →

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