Travis Fox – Remains To Be Seen

Review by Wayne Swanson • This is one disorienting book. It deals with serious social issues — the effects of environmental pollution, institutional racism, the rise and fall of the industrial economy, and more. Yet the photos sure are beautiful. The painterly effects invite comparisons with a who’s who of modern artists.  That’s a lot... Continue Reading →

Zhou HanShun – Frenetic City

Review by Douglas Stockdale • Living in a large urban city can be an intense experience. The constant crush of humanity at times a little bit overwhelming, while trying to find some personal space may be slightly vexing. Perhaps this is more of the view point of someone who finds themselves immersed in this sea... Continue Reading →

Patrick O’Hare – Evanescent Cities

Review by Paul Anderson • In a very curious way, photographs can be magical. Photographs, as is well known, capture three-dimensional scenes as frozen moments in time. This action instantly transforms a scene into a new context. Sometimes, that transformation provides a contemplative experience. A skilled photographer can transform an everyday scene that, say, a New... Continue Reading →

Debi Cornwall – Necessary Fictions

Review by Wayne Swanson • From the first images, it’s obvious that this is a book of photographs from the war-torn Middle East. Iraq perhaps, or maybe Afghanistan. It’s hard to tell. But the desert settings, harsh desert light, and stark desert compounds make the location clear.  Except that it’s not. The setting is actually... Continue Reading →

PhotoBook Journal – Issue 19

Welcome to our 19th Issue •We have a another broad selection of photobook reviews this past month for your continuing consideration; social commentaries, urban landscape studies, environmental call to action and narratives about life, while we also found ourselves going to the dogs this month.Meanwhile, the Covid-19 pandemic is getting worse and we hope for a new American... Continue Reading →

Lukasz Rusznica – Subterranean River

Review by Douglas Stockdale • What might occur when one decides to investigate something very foreign that is additionally complicated by the fact it is also an unseen entity? The Polish photographer Lukasz Rusznica took on this slightly impossible task when he ventured to Japan with the hope of revealing the spirit of kami, the Japanese... Continue Reading →

Karola Jansen – Un Natural Species

Review by Douglas Stockdale • Ubiquitous. The use of plastic is everywhere and has become a classic double-edged sword. Its properties enable food and beverages to last longer, while its inherent chemical structure allow it to last almost forever. While many plastics can be recycled, getting the used plastic containers to the proper destinations for... Continue Reading →

Sal Taylor Kydd – Landfall

Review by Douglas Stockdale • “Landfall” is a term to describe an approach to or a sighting of land that signals an arrival at one’s destination at the end of a journey across the sea. Landfall is a physical event, or in Sal Taylor Kydd’s recently released artist book, Landfall, it is both a physical as well as a... Continue Reading →

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